Parsons, H F (1846 – 1913).

Henry Franklin Parsons was a civil servant and doctor (medical inspector). He trained at St Mary’s – see below (a snippet from The Lancet) :

He and his family lived at  Whitworth Road, South Norwood and then Oakhyrst, 4 Park Hill Rise, Croydon.   His father (Joshua) was also a doctor in Beckington, near Frome; and was still practising medicine well into his seventies.

Henry was the eldest of fourteen children; his brother Alfred was an artist / painter (landscapes and botanical works).  Henry was a member of various learned societies, for example : the Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society – as listed below


He was also an active member of the Microscopical Society
http://www.archive.org/stream/journalofmicrosc03post#page/56/mode/2up/search/parsons
and the Croydon Microscopical and Natural History Club.  He was a member of their meteorological committee and a vice-president of the Club circa 1905 ;have a look in the link below –

http://www.archive.org/stream/proceedingstrans01croy#page/n53/mode/2up/search/parsons

He was also interested in what are now termed phenological studies, which no doubt tied in with his meteorological recordings.

There is a note in Journal of Bryology, Vol 6 that he collected (bryological) specimens near Beckington, and that some of these specimens are held in the Oxford herbarium, and Fenscore indicates that other might be in the Devizes Museum.

He died 29th October, 1913.

Information and snippets obtained from uploads at www.archive.org

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One Response to Parsons, H F (1846 – 1913).

  1. Peter David Scott says:

    Dr. Parsons was a founder and president of Goole Scientific Society in Yorkshire for many years before moving to Croydon.
    This society also included Malcolm Morris (later Sir), dermatologist and pioneer of the use of colloidal silver in the treatment of infection, and also Dr. John Milne Bramwell who introduced hypnotism and hypnotic suggestion as a means of medical treatment and anesthesia. Another member of the society, Thomas Birks, recorder of botany, studied the algae of Goole and Thorne moors and was a founder member of the British Mycological Society, and the Yorkshire Naturalists Union.

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